SAP Basis/Netweaver Tutorials, Monitoring, Administration(Certification) and FAQs Headline Animator

SAP Basis/Netweaver Tutorials, Monitoring, Administration(Certification) and FAQs


Friday, 26 August 2011

SAP Java Monitoring Check list 2

This article is in continuation with the below article :





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To check “Logs and Traces”, navigate to System Management -> Monitoring -> Logs and Traces
From the drop down box, different logs can be checked









Process list – List of processes that are currently running can  be viewed here and any long running process can be identified and actioned accordingly.



Using Management Console for monitoring Java System :
To open management console for SAP systems based on Unix operating system, add 13 for the port of the portal as mentioned below

A screen similar to below screen will appear :



You can drill down further on SID of the system to view database,Central and SCS instance details as below :






Please note that Management Console can be accessed even when java is down for a sap system.
You can check database status as below :





You can check the javanode status as below:

Status should be running here if java is up





Process list – List of processes that are currently running can  be viewed here and any long running process can be identified and actioned accordingly.



SDM, Dispatcher, Server0 and server1 node status can be checked here:






Various work directory logs, availability log, application log and default trace can be checked here :


















Availability log :



Sapstart log:



Dev_jcontrol log :



Dev_server0 log :



To check the status of message and enqueue servers, check the process list under scs instance as mentioned below :




To check various logs related to message server, enqueue server, jcmon check the logs under SCS instance as mentioned below :






Related Link :
Live Cache Monitoring in SAP










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SAP Profiles

This article answers the following queries:

  • What are SAP Profiles? Why are they needed?
  • What are the different types of SAP Profiles and their significance?
  • What is the path of profile directory in SAP?
  • What is the location of profiles in SAP?
  • Which SAP profile is used to define system wide settings?
  • What are the contents of Default profile ( DEFAULT.PFL), Start Profile and Instance Profiles ?
  • What are the naming conventions of various SAP Profiles?
  • If instance profile is modified, what needs to be done for the changes to take effect?
  • If default profile is modified, what needs to be done for the changes to take effect?
  • What is the significance of cdpro command in SAP related to AIX or HPUX Operating systems?
  • If an instance profile is modified is it required to restart entire SAP system?
  • What is the sequence in which SAP profiles are read by the SAP system?
  • If some value is set for a parameter in default profile and in instance profile another value is set for an instance. For that instance which value will take precedence? Is it default profile value or instance profile value?
  • What is the sap parameter that is used to set the profiles path in an SAP system? In which profile it would be set?

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SAP R/3 systems uses  Profiles  to define the properties of an SAP R/3 Instance such as the type and number of work processes, the size of main memory reserved for SAP R/3 and various parameters like multiple logon, idle time out value etc
There are 3 types of profiles in SAP.
They are


  • DEFAULT.PFL (known as System Profile)
  • Start Profile
  • Instance Profile

All the profiles mentioned above are stored in the profile directory defined during installation of the SAP system.
This path can be set using DIR_PROFILE profile parameter in the start profile.
Ideally the path of profile directory would be
In Unix Systems :
/usr/sap/<SID>/SYS/profile or /sapmnt/<SID>/profile
In Windows NT :
\\<SAPGLOBALHOST>\sapmnt\<SID>\sys\profile

Tip: Please note in AIX or HP-UX environment, we can go to the above profile directory  
              location using cdpro command at Os level.

All instances of a SAP system can read these profiles with share ( Systems based on Windows ) or mount (Systems based on Unix) technology.
DEFAULT.PFL :  This profile exists uniquely in an SAP R/3 system. It means if there are 5 application servers in an SAP system, even then there will be only one DEFAULT.PFL file.
 It contains system-wide settings which include

  • Name of the SAP system
  • The database system
  • Name of the enqueue server
Each SAP R/3 instance to be started reads this profile first. The information specified in this profile is very vital for the functioning of the SAP system.

START PROFILE :   Unlike default profile, the start profile is specific to an instance. It means if there are 5 application servers each will have one separate start profile with the settings specific to an instance.
The startup process of the SAP system is controlled by the start profile that is read by the start program [sapstart]. Here the services(eg: message, gateway, dialog , batch etc) that are to be started are listed. Hence every instance will have separate start profile.
In other words, the start profile determines how, where and under what name individual SAP R/3 services and processes are to start.
The naming convention of START PROFILE will be as below :
START_<instance><instance_number>_<host_name>
Eg: START_DVEBMGS00_prdserv4
For the start profile default names are assigned during the installation of an instance based on the services that are running on the instance. For example, DVEBMGS in the start profile above confirms that following services are available for that instance.
D – Dialog
V – Update
E – Enqueue
B – Batch
M – Message
G – Gateway
S -  Spool

INSTANCE PROFILE :   Like start profile, Instance profile is specific to an instance. It means if there are 5 application servers each will have one separate start profile with the settings specific to an instance.
 The runtime environment of the instance is configured in the instance profile.  In instance profile parameters specific to an instance can  be set like auto gui logout time(rdisp/gui_auto_logout), number of various workprocesses (rdisp/wp_no_dia),  memory related parameters like abap/buffer_size, em/initial_size_MB, rdisp/PG_SHM, rdisp/ROLL_SHM etc
The naming convention for the instance profile will be as below :
<SID>_<instance><instance_number>_<hostname>
Eg :  SQ1_DVEMBSG00_prdsapk1

During the installation of an SAP R/3 system, the profiles are created with standard values. Later it  is Basis administrator’s responsibility to tune the parameters.
The source code of the SAP Kernel already sets standard default values for most of the system parameters. However, you must specify some specific details like computer name, system name and distribution of resources in the profiles.
The SAP profiles are read during the startup of an instance. The values defined in the system profile (ie. DEFAULT.PFL) overwrite the standard settings in the source code. The values defined in the instance profile overwrites the parameter values of DEFAULT.PFL for the instance.

In case of any changes to System Profile ( DEFAULT.PFL or Default Profile), you must restart all the instances of the SAP system as this is common for all instances.
However in case of any changes to instance profile, it is sufficient to take restart of only that particular instance for the changes to take effect.

Sequence of SAP profiles that are read while starting SAP system :
  • First start profiles of various instances are read by the sapstart program
  • Secondly Default profile is read
  • Finally, instance profiles of various instances are read.


Related Links :










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Thursday, 25 August 2011

SAP Java monitoring Check list

This article answers the following queries :

 
 Ø  How to perform daily monitoring of Java stack in SAP ?

Ø  What are the daily checks for Java applications of SAP ?

Ø  How to access management console in SAP ?

Ø  How to perform session monitoring in JAVA stack  of SAP ?

Ø  How to view various java reports in JAVA stack of SAP?

Ø  What are the various java reports available in Java stack of SAP  and what is their significance?

Ø  How to view log and traces in java stack of SAP?

Ø  Where to view default trace in java stack of SAP?

Ø  What is the use of  management console in SAP ?



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JAVA Monitoring

Contents :

1.       Checking the java stack/portal accessibility

2.       Actioning, in case portal not accessible

3.       User load analysis

4.       Java Reports – Navigation and usability

5.       Memory consumption and Threads report

6.       Session Monitoring

7.       Logs and Traces (Default trace, Server0 log etc)

8.       Accessing Management Console

9.       Checking System availability using Management Console(SDM, Msg server, Enqueue server, Java nodes etc)

10.   Check various logs(work directory logs, jcontrol, default trace, application log etc)

Java Monitoring :

Place the link of the respective java application in the browser and check whether the java application is opening:
For example:

If java is up and running, a screen similar to below will open.


If the page did not open,
i)  Check  whether there are network issues
ii) Check tablespaces occupancy levels at Oslevel and make sure sufficient 
    space is there and  if any tablespace is  100% full, action the same
iii) Check the default trace for any critical errors
iv) Check application log to determine any memory related issues
v)  Check server node status at oslevel or through management console and 
     action and bring up the java again.
To estimate the user load and to check the number of users logged onto the java portal :
Navigate to User Administration ->  Activity Reports

i)   Check “Number of users in the last 3 hours” report








   ii)   To figure out most active users, check the 10Most active users report




































Java Reports :

Java Memory Consumption Report and Threads Reports :
These reports includes a chart of the memory usage of a cluster node and a chart related to the system and application thread pool.
To check this report login to nwa of the respective java stack :





Then  navigate to Monitoring -> Java System Reports :

Here following reports can be taken by selecting the respective report from the drop down provided:


ü  Capacity Planning : This report includes a chart representing the requests sent to J2EE Engine, a chart for the number of http and security sessions, and a chart of the communication between J2EE nodes
ü  Resource Consumption : This report includes a chart of the memory usage of a cluster node, and a chart related to the system and application thread pool
ü  Error Statistics:  This report includes a chart representing a collection of counters useful for investigating problems. There are also charts that give an overview of timeouts and the size of log files

ü  Application Activities : This report includes a chart that represents the history of the activities of deployed applications

  •        Slowest requests in detail
  •        Slowest requests
  •        Slowest components
  •        User activities
  •        Current activities
  •        Monitor Browser




However from monitoring perspective, resource consumption report is most important to analyse the memory consumption.

Select resource consumption from the dropdown to view the memory statistics as below:

























Click on Go to Detailed Chart link of the respective report to view detailed chart as below





















Click Hint on charts link to analyse the report better.






Select the respective Instance, Cluster node and Time period from the provided dropdown boxes to view the reports belonging to the same


















Table view for Threads report:

















There are 2 types of views: Chart view and Table view. You can change the view by selecting the respective radio button.
Please find below table view for Memory Consumption report





Session Monitoring:
To monitor sessions, navigate to Monitoring -> Session Monitoring




LiveCache Monitoring







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Wednesday, 24 August 2011

Manual Import process of a transport at Os level with TP program


This article answers following queries :
·         How to import a transport manually with TP program?
·         How to import a transport without using STMS in SAP?
·         How to import a transport at Os level  in SAP ?
·         How to insert a request into the import queue of an SAP R/3 system manually?
·         When performing a request import manually, what will happen if client is not mentioned?
·         Can we manually import all the requests that are present in the import queue of an SAP system? If so, how ?
·         What is the parameter file name which was similar to TP_<domain>.PFL file which was used in older SAP versions?
·         What will happen in the background if a transport request  is added to the import queue of an SAP system ?

·         What will happen if the client in which you want to import does not exist in the target system?

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Sometimes, there will be situations like you have to process transport imports manually. This can be done by TP program from the operating system level.

Transport control program TP is controlled by a parameter file TP_<domain>.PFL which is present under bin subdirectory of the transport directory.
Please note in older releases of SAP R/3, the file is termed as TPPARAM.
Before using TP for the first time, it is suggested to test the connection to the desired target system.
To perform this test, following command can be used.
tp  connect   <target system>  pf=<complete path of the parameter file>
If this test results are fine you can proceed further otherwise you need to troubleshoot the same and identify the reason for the same.

In order to insert a request into the import queue of an SAP R/3 system, use the following command:
tp  addtobuffer   <request>   <target system>  pf=<complete path of the parameter file>

If the above command is successful then, datafile and cofile of the request will get copied under respective  data subdirectory and cofiles subdirectory of the transport directory.
As the request is inserted to the import queue, it can now be imported using the following command.
tp  import  <request>   <target system>  pf=<complete path of the parameter file>
In case you would like to import all the requests that are present in the import queue of an SAP system  in the current sequence then provide the following command at oslevel.
tp  import all  <target system>  pf=<complete path of the parameter file>

You can add the following to specify a specific client for import:
client = <number of the client>
If the client is not mentioned, the data is copied to the client with the same number as the client from which the data was exported.

If the client into which you would like to import a request does not exist in the target system, the import terminates with an error message.






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